Academic and Labor Market Consequences of Four- to Two-Year College Transfer

Thursday, June 30, 2016

A Working Paper from the Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment (CAPSEE) examines the outcomes of students who transfer from four- to two-year colleges. Data used in the study to assess earnings outcomes were based on Unemployment Insurance quarterly wage information from a small state. Students who were "struggling" academically at four-year colleges were able to improve college completion by transferring in this direction, earning Associates degrees or certificates at two-year institutions. These students  were also no less likely than struggling non-transfer students to eventually earn a four-year degree. Although examining medium and long-term outcomes was outside the capacity of this study, data on short-term employment outcomes indicated that students transferring from four- to two-year institutions did no worse overall in the labor market than other struggling students who did not transfer in this direction.

Read the complete report: Do Students Benefit From Going Backward? The Academic and Labor Market Consequences of Four- to Two-Year College Transfer